Hypermobility Info

You may be coming to this website, having recently been identified as Hypermobile by a professional and wish to find out more.  Hypermobility is complex in its nature so I shall begin with a simple explanation…

“Joint Hypermobility is the ability to extend some or all joints (within a person’s body), beyond what is considered a ‘normal’ range’.”


Joint Hypermobility
Joint Hypermobility is the ability to extend some or all joints (within a person’s body), beyond what is considered a ‘normal’ range.   Hypermobility is actually a genetic condition that affects all of the connective tissues within the body (most noticeable therefore in the ligaments/tendons that are trying to hold the joints/bones/muscles together).

Hypermobility is measured on a scale of 0 to 9 (Beighton Scale) .  The Beighton scale is used as a simple indicator of the level of hypermobility presented.  A point being scored for hypermobility presented within a given joint (therefore 9 being the highest level of the scale).  It is worth noting the scale does not test every joint within the body- but it is useful as a standardised tool of generalised hypermobility.

“imagine the skeleton bones being held together with a load of elastic bands, then imagine extra elastic bands connecting the muscles to the bones”

In the hypermobile body, the connective tissues such as the ligaments and tendons, are loose and more elastic and therefore not effective at holding your bones and muscles together.  The best way I can explain it is to imagine the skeleton bones being held together with a load of elastic bands, then imagine extra elastic bands connecting the muscles to the bones.    The body has to work extra hard in trying to hold itself together during everyday activities, and as a result, many suffer with problems/symptoms accordingly.  It is also worth noting that not everyone suffers with pains as a result of their hypermobility, and only benefit from their extra flexibility.

Hypermobility Disorders / Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissues
In March 2017, a new clinical article formally defines the international terminology for diagnosis of a particular hypermobility condition.  To read about this in further detail, pop to the ‘useful links’ section below.

Hypermobility is part of your genetic code (your collagen to be exact), it can’t be cured but it can be managed to help keep those symptoms under careful control.

For a little more detail, see here: